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Deductive Logic

 

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Deductive logic reasons academic writing in the social science

 

We progressively aim to help students move forward. We have picked out the relevant connecting points to forward writing a thesis. We provide introductory descriptions, justifying how to write such a research paper. Deductive Logic is the traditional research method used to write a research paper. Here we illustrate the ingredients of how to conduct such research. Then, when these basic components have been grasped, Step Four combines and develops these concepts by presenting over fifteen possible structures to utilise. Here we describe in step-by-step detail how to write a research paper. If needed, Step Five presents the options that should be taken if the research could not be completed.

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Consider a thesis’s content

1) Basic written structures and involvement of a document – free download >>

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Build on essential knowledge

2) Various historical aims of research – free download >>

3) Sampling – essential research conditions – free download >>

 

Deductive research has a beginning and a specific end. Such research has reason to involve specific research activities. Knowledge is expressed in a defined form. For example, knowledge is either sense experienced or arrives from reason. A research activity then needs to be defined to present a research situation. Build research by knowing the reasons for conducting a specific type of research. When presented with a particular research activity the researcher then needs to collect these observations. Various research methods are used to collect observations. But please be aware, philosophical empiricists hold no knowledge can be properly inferred or deduced unless it is derived from ones sense-based experience.

Before writing, get to know the relevant connections of an observation. For instance, rationalism “…asserts that reason is the only basis of valid knowledge of reality… [and] thus reject revelation as a source of knowledge” [1] Rationality is “…a term used by sociologists to define a distinguishing characteristic of modernity, which [are] …governed by logic and order” [2] But when presenting a realist claim. “How can we be sure that, on any particular occasion, what we seem to observe may not turn out to have been illusory? [Consider] Since we have no access to the world that is not mediated by thought or language, what independent check have we upon the reliability of what we think or say?” [3]

Various claim options can justify a realist claim. For instance, question if idealism should be used. Idealism represents a respondent’s thoughts and perceptions. “…the proper way to gain knowledge of society is through the investigation of thinking” [5] Alternately, should the meaningful action of a respondent be presented? Meaningful action is, “…meanings that society has for individuals or groups” [4] Or would symbolic interactionism be more fashionable to present. Symbolic interactionism is,

“…a theoretical approach in sociology that draws its inspiration from Weber, and starts from the assumption that we inhabit a symbolic world in which symbols have shared meaning. Language is one set of symbols that we share” [6]

For instance, ‘what type of conversation analysis would then be questioned’? [7] Or, would the claim involve relativism. Relativism can only be defined regionally, involving regional cultural, knowledge and values.

“To claim strongly, that morals are relative – moral relativism – is to claim that what is right is solely a local matter, to be judged only by particular communities at particular times” [8]

But consider, is an observation is a conclusive certainty. When writing build on this knowledge. Research definitions need to be presented in the introduction. After being introduced the research activity has reason to be discussed.

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Put knowledge into practice

4) Ebook describing how to write research using Deductive Logic

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5) Ebook describing the tactics that need to be employed if the research has failed

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Bibliography

[1] Abercrombie, N. et al. (1994) The penguin dictionary of sociology. Third Edition. London: Peguin Books. pp.346
[2] Lawson,T. and Joan Garrod (2001) Dictionary of sociology. London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. p.202
[3] Marshall, G. (1994) Concise Dictionary of Sociology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp.438-440
[4] Marshall, G. (1994) Concise Dictionary of Sociology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p.319
[5] Marshall, G. (1994) Concise Dictionary of Sociology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p.232
[6] Lawson,T. and Joan Garrod (2001) Dictionary of sociology. London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers. p.246
[7] Jary,D. and Julia Jary. (1991) Collins Dictionary of Sociology. Glasgow: Harper Collins Publishers. pp.358-359
[8] Jary,D. and Julia Jary. (1991) Collins Dictionary of Sociology. Glasgow: Harper Collins Publishers. pp.526-527

 

 

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